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Meteorologics

With the data available, we decided to use a computational grid of size tex2html_wrap_inline3397. Given the sparsity and the resolution of the population data, land use data, and meteorological data available, this seemed to be a comfortable compromise between computational accuracy and data accuracy. The grid spacing chosen was 9086.9m. This a compromise between several values, since tex2html_wrap_inline3399 in north-south direction has a length of tex2html_wrap_inline3401m on the surface of the earth, but the same angle in west-east direction has a length of tex2html_wrap_inline3403m on tex2html_wrap_inline3379 latitude and tex2html_wrap_inline3407m on tex2html_wrap_inline3381 latitude.

All settings in the air dispersion model used are standard ones as recommended in [6], i. e. the time step length is one hour, four puffs are released per hour, twice per hour a sampling of pollutant concentration takes place, etc. No air chemistry has been included in the case study, and no precipitation data has been used. The emission rate of the hypothetical pollutant described in Section 6.1.4 was set to 1000 gstex2html_wrap_inline3411. Note that changing this value does not represent a scaling of the objective function, due to the nonlinear Michaelis-Menten-term for metabolism in the liver (see next section). The temperature of the exhaust gas was set to 434 tex2html_wrap_inline3413K, while the exhaust speed was set to 50 mstex2html_wrap_inline3411 for a opening diameter of 4m. No other pollution emitter has been placed on the computational grid.


next up previous contents
Next: Chemokinetics Up: Modeling Issues Previous: Modeling Issues

Joerg Fliege
Wed Dec 22 12:25:31 CET 1999